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Getting Graphic with Immigration Research

Getting Graphic with Immigration Research

Mason economics professor Bryan Caplan’s newest book, Open Borders: The Science and Ethics of Immigration (First Second, 2019), is a nonfiction graphic novel Illustrated by Zach Weinersmith (article image also by Zach Weinersmith).

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Available soon:   Caplan's graphic novel

Available soon: Caplan's graphic novel

In his timely book, Caplan's non-fiction graphic novel addresses the leading objections to open borders. His goal is to be part of the solution. #1 on Amazon's New Releases chart. Publication date: October 29, 2019.

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More than just bribery

More than just bribery

Professor Tyler Cowen writes in Bloomberg Opinion that most U.S. institutions of higher education don't even try to live up to their egalitarian ideals.

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Emergent Ventures Announced First Cohort

Emergent Ventures Announced First Cohort

The Mercatus Center's new fellowship and grant program, Emergent Ventures, announced its first cohort of recipients. Among the list of recipients was Joy Buchanan, a graduate of Mason's economics doctoral program. Emergent Ventures is led by Professor Tyler Cowen.

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Trade in Ideas Program: Theory and Practice

Trade in Ideas Program: Theory and Practice

On October 26, 2018, Eskil Ullberg, adjunct professor of economics, presented an overview of the Trade In Ideas Program and early results. The presentation was given at the WTO for the Working Group on Trade and Transfer of Technology.

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Making her mark at Mason

Making her mark at Mason

Economics major, Fatma Gdoura, is setting herself up for a robust career in Development Economics and Immigration Studies through her coursework, internships, and a fellowship with the Mercatus Center.

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Framework for a Global Patent Market

Framework for a Global Patent Market

In the World Economic Forum, Eskil Ullberg, adjunct professor of economics, writes an op-ed with Edmund Phelps, Nobel laureate in economics 2006. They discuss how a rules-based global trade system for patents could improve productivity growth for developed and developing countries alike.

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Influence in Game Theory and Decision Science

Influence in Game Theory and Decision Science

Recent metrics rank the Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization as the number one most influential journal in Game Theory and Decision Science. Professor Dan Houser serves as the journal’s co-editor-in-chief.

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Erosion of the Constitution

Erosion of the Constitution

In 1993, Dr. Walter Williams, John M. Olin Distinguished Professor of Economics and 1986 Nobel Economist Dr. James Buchanan discussed the legitimate role of government in society in this Idea Channel Discussion episode.

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The comeback of the classical liberal

The comeback of the classical liberal

A Politico Magazine article discusses the origins and comeback of the classical liberal. Mentioned in the article, Professor Dan Klein gives insight into the "libertarian moment" and how this impacted the movement of classical liberalism.

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Answering a Classical Question

Answering a Classical Question

Timothy Taylor, managing editor of the Journal of Economic Perspectives, comments on Peter Boettke's Presidential Address given to the Southern Economic Association. Taylor discusses Boettke's speech in the context of answering the question: does government empower or stifle?

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A Changing Workforce

A Changing Workforce

Tyler Cowen comments on the changing American workforce and discusses how companies that tap into the potential of workers over the age of 55 will have the competitive advantage in the years to come.

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A Blurred Line

A Blurred Line

In USA Today Professor Christopher Coyne and Mason alumna Abigail Hall look at the recent death of Stephon Clark. They examine the increasing militarization of the United States police force and how proactive foreign policy can result in a changed law enforcement operation.

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Trade is Not a Job Killer

Trade is Not a Job Killer

Donald Boudreaux, professor of economics, examines the misplaced notion that trade kills jobs. The op-ed article published in the New York Times examines the difference between average job churn and job loss from trade.

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Trade in Ideas Program

Trade in Ideas Program

Professor Eskil Ullberg met with representatives from over twenty countries on February 26th, 2018 to host the Trade in Ideas Program at the World Trade Organization.

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The Lesson from a Tariff Tale

The Lesson from a Tariff Tale

Vernon Smith, Nobel laureate and Mason Professor Emeritus, reflects on his conversation with President George W. Bush about the 2002 Bush steel tariff. Nearly sixteen years later, the conversation is still relevant.

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Increased Learning or Increased Cheating?

Increased Learning or Increased Cheating?

César Martinelli's research featured in the American Economic Journal: Economic Policy reveals the prevalence of cheating when high school students are incentivized with cash to perform well on exams.

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A Pirate's Life for Me

A Pirate's Life for Me

Peter Leeson's research on pirate responsibilities and employee structure mentioned in an article describing what life was like for pirates.

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Celebrating success

Celebrating success

The mood in EagleBank Arena was lively on May 18 and 19, as the College of Humanities and Social Sciences held its degree celebration ceremonies. Congratulations again to all of our graduates! We are pleased to welcome you to an impressive community of alumni, made only stronger by the class of 2017.

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The college welcomes Edward Lengel and Lt. Col. Suzanne Devlin to the 2017 degree celebrations

The college welcomes Edward Lengel and Lt. Col. Suzanne Devlin to the 2017 degree celebrations

The College of Humanities and Social Sciences is pleased to announce the May 2017 degree celebrations will be led by two outstanding alumni: chief historian for the White House Historical Association, Edward Lengel, and Lt. Col. Suzanne Devlin, a former acting chief of police for the Fairfax County Police Department and the current supervisor of safety and security for Loudoun County Public Schools.

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Tyler Cowen's new book is getting plenty of media attention

Tyler Cowen's new book is getting plenty of media attention

The book, “The Complacent Class: The Self-Defeating Quest for the American Dream,” has led to two NPR interviews, one with NPR Morning Edition host Rachel Martin and one with On Point host Tom Ashbrook. The Mercatus Center also hosted a live interview this week between Cowen and Reason Magazine’s Katherine Mangu-Ward on American complacency and what it means for the future of politics and the economy.

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Williams honored as 2017 recipient of the Bradley Prize

Williams honored as 2017 recipient of the Bradley Prize

Walter E. Williams, John M. Olin Distinguished Professor of Economics at George Mason University, is one of this year’s winners of the distinguished Bradley Prize, for “individuals of extraordinary talent and determination who have made contributions of excellence” in areas consistent with the mission of the Lynde and Harry Bradley Foundation.

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The Joys of Yiddish and Economics

The Joys of Yiddish and Economics

Professor Dan Klein uses classic Yiddish stories and humor to illustrate key economic insights about prices, commerce, market innovation, and consumer choice. His paper was among the Weekly Top 5 of all papers at the Social Science Research Network.

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Boudreaux argues for Econ 101 in National Review In The Media

Boudreaux argues for Econ 101 in National Review

In an article on the website for the James G. Martin Center for Academic Renewal, cited in The National Review’s site, Donald Boudreaux, faculty member in the Department of Economics argues for the utility of Economics 101 courses.

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Sisters gain perspective on overseas experiences

Sisters gain perspective on overseas experiences

Rachael and Lauren Agnello—sisters from Pittsburgh and both students in the college--said their parents always encouraged them to learn the way they saw best. What was best, the sisters decided, was to get out of the country, experience other cultures and learn new languages.

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Voter Registration at Leading Universities

Voter Registration at Leading Universities

Economics Professor Daniel Klein collaborated on a study that investigates voter registration at 40 leading US universities in the fields of Economics, History, Journalism/Communications, Law, and Psychology. Their findings? Democrats outnumber Republicans 11.5 to 1.

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Fall for the Book: a Fairfax Tradition

Fall for the Book: a Fairfax Tradition

Fall for the Book brings writers, readers, and scholars together like no other event in the region. In its eighteenth year, Fall for the Book is a weeklong literary festival with events taking place on Mason's Fairfax campus and at other venues across the region between September 25 and September 30.

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George Mason University Graduate Showcase: Registration Now Open

George Mason University Graduate Showcase: Registration Now Open

Mason's Office of Graduate Admissions cordially invites you to attend our largest annual event for prospective graduate students. Learn about graduate degree programs, graduate certificates, and professional degrees. Come see the excitement of our campus, meet our faculty, and speak with admissions representatives.

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Why Trump's Prosperous Supporters are Angry, Too

Why Trump's Prosperous Supporters are Angry, Too

Tyler Cowen, Professor of Economics at George Mason University and economics columnist at Bloomberg, writes about a "less heralded force influencing American politics: insufficient savings...." Is Trump in part a result of a "broader and larger impatience that has plagued American society for decades"?

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Innovation through Interdisciplinarity

Innovation through Interdisciplinarity

The provost’s multidisciplinary research initiative, now in its second year, gives interdisciplinary teams from Mason faculty, staff, students, and/or community partners an opportunity to showcase their creativity as they respond to important challenges facing the region, nation, or world.

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When Simulations Replace Reality: A Q&A with Robin Hanson

When Simulations Replace Reality: A Q&A with Robin Hanson

Economics professor, Robin Hanson, is "addicted to 'viewquakes,' insights which dramatically change my world view." Scientific American interviewed Dr. Hanson about his new book, "The Age of Em: Work, Love and Life When Robots Rule the Earth" and other topics.

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More Time to Unwind, Unless You're a Woman

More Time to Unwind, Unless You're a Woman

Economist John Maynard Keynes predicted that by 2030, people in wealthy nations would work no more than 15 hours a week. Mason economist Tyler Cowen notes that although older people are working much less than they did decades ago, women in particular are not.

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Congratulations Class of 2016

Congratulations Class of 2016

Dr. Daniel Houser, Chair of the Economics Department, applauds our most recent graduates. "I am so very proud of all of our graduates, and I offer my sincere congratulations to all on this accomplishment."

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The Seen and Unseen

The Seen and Unseen

"Tariff policy beneficiaries are always seen, but its victims are mostly unseen. Politicians love this. The reason is simple." states Walter E. Williams, John M. Olin Distinguished Professor of Economics.

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Behavioral Economics, Explained

Behavioral Economics, Explained

On the occasion of the second edition of his Course in Behavioral Economics textbook, Erik Angner, faculty member, Department of Philosophy, and director, Philosophy, Politics, and Economics program, explains behavioral economics and how the discipline refines standard economic thought.

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Gullible Americans, Exploitive Politicians

Gullible Americans, Exploitive Politicians

"One cannot get something for nothing," George Mason Professor of Economics Walter E. Williams asserts. "Too many Americans believe in the possibility of a free lunch. Politicians exploit that gullibility."

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Klein leads Swedish book club on Hume's 1751 book

Klein leads Swedish book club on Hume's 1751 book

Dan Klein, professor at George Mason, will be leading a book club with Timbro, Sweden's leading classical liberal public-discourse organization. The book under study is David Hume's 1751 book: An Enquiry concerning the Principles of Morals.

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Hive Mind: How Your Nation's IQ Matters So Much More Than Your Own

Hive Mind: How Your Nation's IQ Matters So Much More Than Your Own

George Mason associate professor, Garett Jones, argues in his new book, "... modest differences in national IQ can explain most cross-country inequalities. Whereas IQ scores do a moderately good job of predicting individual wages, information processing power, and brain size, a country's average score is a much stronger bellwether of its overall prosperity."

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Walter Williams: Suppressing Free Speech

Walter Williams: Suppressing Free Speech

In a recent editorial, Mason Economics professor Walter Williams takes issue with the use of federal statutes to suppress those who question global warming.

MIT Technology Review: Cowen Discusses Implications of Workplace Monitoring In The Media

MIT Technology Review: Cowen Discusses Implications of Workplace Monitoring

In MIT Technology Review, Tyler Cowen, faculty member in the Department of Economics and general director of the Mercatus Center at George Mason University, describes how advancements in technology to monitor worker productivity can lead to wage inequality and higher productivity, but also lower employee morale and generally threaten employee privacy.

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Tullock Memorial Conference

Tullock Memorial Conference

Twenty-two scholars from around the world have been invited to survey, analyze, and critique Gordon Tullock's innovative research program and assess its impact on the fields of economic, law, and political science.

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Is Capitalism Moral?

Is Capitalism Moral?

George Mason University Professor Walter E. Williams discusses the free market system as a way of organizing economic behavior that is not only economically superior but also morally superior.

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Gun buyback and gun dropbox programs proven ineffective states Alex Tabarrok In The Media

Gun buyback and gun dropbox programs proven ineffective states Alex Tabarrok

Gun control advocates in Tacoma, Washington are considering a gun dropbox program as an attempt to get weapons off the streets. Economics professor, Alex Tabarrok, predicts dropbox program or gun buyback programs are not effective. Funds used for these types of programs would be better served funding an additional police officer.

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Gordon Tullock Celebration of his Research

Gordon Tullock Celebration of his Research

A conference on Gordon Tullock's economic, political, and legal research is being held in Founders Hall of George Mason's Arlington Campus on Friday October 2 and Saturday October 3, 2015. Gordon Tullock was one of the founders of the field of research that came to be called Public Choice. He was coauthor of one of the most important books in the field, the Calculus of Consent (with Nobel Prize winner James Buchanan). The conference provides an overview of his innovative research program and assesses its impact on the fields of economics, law, and political science.

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Why Donald Trump is Winning

Why Donald Trump is Winning

In a Washington Post Wonkblog piece on the success of the Donald Trump presidential campaign, Bryan Caplan identifies ‘anti-foreign’ sentiment as a likely factor.

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The struggle for economic liberty

The struggle for economic liberty

Here’s my taxi question. If a person is law-abiding, has a driver’s license, has a car or van that has passed safety inspection, and has adequate liability insurance, is there any consumer-oriented reason he should not be able to become a taxicab owner/operator? Put another way: If you wish to hire the services of such a person, what right does a third party have to prevent that exchange?

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Can Philosopher Alex Tabarrok Bridge the Wonks and Burning Man?

Can Philosopher Alex Tabarrok Bridge the Wonks and Burning Man?

The OZY site’s profile of Alex Tabarrok, faculty member in the Department of Economics and director, Center for the Study of Public Choice, terms him “a philosopher king of modern libertarian zeitgeist” and describes his ability for bringing the message of libertarianism to a wider audience.

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A 'Liberal Plea' in Intercollegiate Review

A 'Liberal Plea' in Intercollegiate Review

The Intercollegiate Review site features an article by Daniel Klein, faculty member in the Department of Economics, who invokes “Game of Thrones,” Google’s ngram analysis, and economic history to argue against the liberal use of the word, “liberal.”

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End Ban on U.S. Oil Exports, Recommends Boudreaux

End Ban on U.S. Oil Exports, Recommends Boudreaux

On the Philly.com website, Donald Boudreaux, faculty member in the Department of Economics and senior fellow, Center for the Study of Public Choice, urges the end to restrictions on the export of American oil, arguing that lifting the ban would spur production of American crude oil and investment in energy development.

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The Decline Of The American Entrepreneur by Don Boudreaux and Jason Clemens

The Decline Of The American Entrepreneur by Don Boudreaux and Jason Clemens

The United States continues to suffer from a historically weak economic recovery. Monthly GDP and employment numbers remain near anemic. From a historical perspective the economy should be roaring by now given the pronounced contraction in 2008. Many explanations have been offered but the core reason for the U.S.’s slow recovery, and one that will continue to impede prosperity, is the decline in economic freedom and its impact on entrepreneurship, both of which began prior to the recession.

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Experimental Findings "On the origins of dishonesty: From parents to children" by GMU's Daniel Houser and others

Experimental Findings "On the origins of dishonesty: From parents to children" by GMU's Daniel Houser and others

Dishonesty is a pervasive and costly phenomenon. This column reports the results of a lab experiment in which parents had an opportunity to behave dishonestly. Parents cheated the most when the prize was for their child and their child was not present. Parents cheated little when their child was present, but were more likely to cheat in front of sons than in front of daughters. The latter finding may help to explain why women attach greater importance to moral norms and are more honest.

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White Discusses Ecuador's New Electronic Money System on CNBC.com In The Media

White Discusses Ecuador's New Electronic Money System on CNBC.com

CNBC.com reports that Ecuador's Sistema de Dinero Electrónico is soon to become the world's first state-run electronic payment system. Lawrence White, faculty member, Department of Economics and Mercatus Center, comments that although the currency is tied to American dollars, it appears to serve as Ecuador's first step away from that standard.

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A Professor Who Suffers No Fools

A Professor Who Suffers No Fools

A Human Events article highlighting Professor Walter Williams and the recent PBS documentary, Suffer No Fools, which is partly based on Walter’s 2010 book, Up from the Projects, about his life and career.

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The Passing of Gordon Tullock (1922 - 2014)

The Passing of Gordon Tullock (1922 - 2014)

The Economics Department is sad to announce that Gordon Tullock passed away on November 3, 2014, at the age of 92. Please see the letter from the President and Executive Director of the Public Choice Society, as well as links to our faculty's center and blog tributes to Dr. Tullock and Washington Post article.

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College Celebrates Alumni at Two Special Events

College Celebrates Alumni at Two Special Events

The College of Humanities and Social Sciences rolled out a red carpet for its alumni over the course of two evenings during the university's Alumni Weekend. The Distinguished Alumni Reception recognized some of the contributions made by college alumni, and a social event, open to all college alumni, combined scholarship and relaxing fun.

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Obama's Misleading Minimum Wage Statistics by Don Boudreaux and Liya Palagashvili Headlines

Obama's Misleading Minimum Wage Statistics by Don Boudreaux and Liya Palagashvili

In U.S. News & World Report, Professor Don Boudreaux and an Economics PhD student, Liya Palagashvili, analyze some numbers that President Obama recently cited in support of raising the minimum wage.

The Impact Factor and Ranking of the Journal of Socio-Economics

The Impact Factor and Ranking of the Journal of Socio-Economics

A new study comparing the major scholarly economics journals found that the Journal of Neuroscience, Psychology, and Economics, which is co-edited by Mason Economics Chairman and ICES Director, Daniel Houser, has a two-year impact factor of 1.35. It was ranked 16th out of 64 major economics journals. The same ranking shows Econometrica having an impact factor of 3.37, the highest in that ranking.

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Liberalism Unrelinquished: An interview with Dan Klein

Liberalism Unrelinquished: An interview with Dan Klein

Daniel Klein is interviewed here about his project Liberalism Unrelinquished, which seeks to recover the original political meaning of the term liberal.

Leeson Named to Duncan Black Professorship

Leeson Named to Duncan Black Professorship

The Duncan Black Professorship of Economics and Law was established by Gordon Tullock, professor emeritus of Mason’s Department of Economics and School of Law, who is considered one of the pioneers in the field of public choice.

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Professor Bryan Caplan debating for Intelligence Squared in NYC on Oct. 30 Faculty Afoot

Professor Bryan Caplan debating for Intelligence Squared in NYC on Oct. 30

If we value a free market in goods and free movement of capital, should we embrace the free movement of labor? Reciprocal treaties would allow citizens of the U.S. and other countries to work legally across borders. Would the elimination of barriers in the labor market depress wages and flood the marketplace with workers? Or would the benefits of a flexible labor supply be a boon to our economy, all while raising the standard of living for anyone willing to work?

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University Mourns Passing of Charles Rowley

University Mourns Passing of Charles Rowley

Professor Charles K. Rowley passed away on Friday, August 2. A faculty member in Mason's Department of Economics since 1984, he was named the Duncan Black Professor of Economics in 2000, and served as the president and general director of the Locke Institute.

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Professor Peter Boettke Receives Honorary Doctorate Accolades

Professor Peter Boettke Receives Honorary Doctorate

Congratulations to Professor Boettke on receiving an honorary doctorate from Alexandru Ioan Cuza University in Romania this Spring 2013.

Dr. Peter J. Boettke named Founding Honorary President of the World Interdisciplinary Network Accolades

Dr. Peter J. Boettke named Founding Honorary President of the World Interdisciplinary Network

Congratulations to Dr. Boettke for being named the Founding Honorary President of the World Interdisciplinary Network for Institutional Research, affiliated with the Journal of Institutional Economics [Cambridge University].

David Brook's article, "What Our Words Tell Us," highlights research by GMU's Dr. Daniel Klein Headlines

David Brook's article, "What Our Words Tell Us," highlights research by GMU's Dr. Daniel Klein

Daniel Klein of George Mason University has conducted one of the broadest studies with the Google search engine. He found further evidence of individualization and demoralization showing that our society has become more individualistic and less morally aware. Liberals sometimes argue that our main problems come from the top: a self-dealing elite, the oligarchic bankers. But the evidence suggests that individualism and demoralization are pervasive up and down society, and may be even more pervasive at the bottom. Liberals also sometimes talk as if our problems are fundamentally economic, and can be addressed politically, through redistribution. But maybe the root of the problem is also cultural.

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College Prepares for May 2013 Convocations

College Prepares for May 2013 Convocations

This May, the College of Humanities and Social Sciences plans to host three convocations: one each for its graduate students, undergraduate humanities and interdisciplinary programs students, and undergraduate social sciences students.

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Dan Klein's Lecture at Brown University Faculty Afoot

Dan Klein's Lecture at Brown University

Members of Students for Liberty, a group that aims to promote discussion and education on freedom and rights, invited Klein to speak because they thought he could provide a unique perspective on the “different ways people come to the ideas of libertarianism."

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Donald Boudreaux and Mark Perry: The Myth of a Stagnant Middle Class in the WSJ Headlines

Donald Boudreaux and Mark Perry: The Myth of a Stagnant Middle Class in the WSJ

Don Boudreaux and his former grad assistant, Mark Perry, challenge the assertion that middle-class Americans have stagnated economically since the 1970s.

In Appreciation: James M. Buchanan by Don Boudreaux

In Appreciation: James M. Buchanan by Don Boudreaux

Professor Eskil Ullberg Speeks to the UN

Professor Eskil Ullberg Speeks to the UN

The Department of Economics' ICES scholar, Professor Eskil Ullberg, was invited to speak to the Second Committee on Science, Technology and Innovation for Development on Friday, November, 16, from 10:50 a.m. to 11:10 a.m. He was one of four experts in over 100 nations. They discussed the topic of "Technology, Innovation, and LDCs."

Professor David Levy Named Distinguished Fellow of the History of Economics Society Accolades

Professor David Levy Named Distinguished Fellow of the History of Economics Society

The Department of Economics is delighted to announce that David Levy has been named Distinguished Fellow of the History of Economics Society (HES). The HES bestows this honor on those who have contributed a lifetime of study to the history of economics. The department is tremendously proud of David for having earned this honor. Congratulations, Dr. Levy!

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Transcript of 1944 Bretton Woods Conference Found at Treasury Headlines

Transcript of 1944 Bretton Woods Conference Found at Treasury

Kurt Schuler, a GMU PhD graduate affiliated with Mercatus Center actually found the original Bretton Woods archival papers in a hidden corner of the Treasury Dept. “Everyone thinks they know what happened at Bretton Woods, but what they know has been filtered by generations of historical accounts,” Barry Eichengreen, a professor or economics and political science at the University of California, Berkeley, said in a statement. “International monetary history will never be the same.”

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Alumnus Camsky to Represent Port City at CHSS Beer Tasting Alumni News

Alumnus Camsky to Represent Port City at CHSS Beer Tasting

The College of Humanities and Social Sciences will host its second annual Alumni Weekend Beer Tasting on Saturday, Oct. 6. Jason Camsky, BS ’08, economics, will lead the Beer Tasting in his role as a regional sales manager for the Port City Brewing Company.

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Dr. Boudreaux in the New York Times' "Room for Debate" Headlines

Dr. Boudreaux in the New York Times' "Room for Debate"

In today's New York Times's "Room for Debate," the questions posed and debated are: "What policies, if any, should the United States pursue to encourage high-tech manufacturers like Apple to build their products in America rather than largely in Asia? Is this manufacturing worth going after?"

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More Than 2,500 Students Walk at College Convocations

More Than 2,500 Students Walk at College Convocations

A record number of students from the College of Humanities and Social Sciences at George Mason University walked across the stage in grand fashion during their convocations on May 17 and 18, 2012. More than 2,500 graduating students were recognized for their efforts in two distinguished ceremonies.

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Cowen's New Book Brings Feedback to the Table

Cowen's New Book Brings Feedback to the Table

George Mason University economist Tyler Cowen put his two passions - economics and food - together in his recent book, "An Economist Gets Lunch: New Rules for Everyday Foodies." His work drew an abundance of media feedback, some of which is collected here.

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Boudreaux's Op-Ed, "Shady solar dealings: The president’s green energy policies don’t add up" Headlines

Boudreaux's Op-Ed, "Shady solar dealings: The president’s green energy policies don’t add up"

In this article, Professor Boudreaux points out the President's contradictory subsidies of Solyndra while imposing new tariffs on imported, foreign-made solar panels.

The Millionaire Subsidy Elimination Act

The Millionaire Subsidy Elimination Act

Walter E. Williams and Stephen Moore write in the Wall Street Journal that cutting benefits to those who don't need them is a better way to trim deficits than hurting the economy with higher tax rates. December 9, 2011

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Cowen Among the FP Top 100 Global Thinkers Headlines

Cowen Among the FP Top 100 Global Thinkers

Foreign Policy presents a unique portrait of 2011's global marketplace of ideas and the thinkers who make them. Tyler Cowen is among the Foreign Policy Top 100 Global Thinkers at #72 on the list.

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Economics Department Newsletter November 2011

Economics Department Newsletter November 2011

Check out our first Economics Department Alumni newsletter for November 2011.

"A Devalued Renminbi Makes Wealthier Americans" by Don Boudreaux Headlines

"A Devalued Renminbi Makes Wealthier Americans" by Don Boudreaux

Don Boudreaux's US News article explains why "A Devalued Renminbi Makes Wealthier Americans." October 13, 2011

Garett Jones on C-SPAN In The Media

Garett Jones on C-SPAN

Garett Jones talked about jobs created by the 2009 economic stimulus, and he responded to telephone calls and electronic communications. Topics included the number of jobs that were actually created, the criteria used for determining if a job was created, and the difference between a job created and a job "shifted."

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Boston Herald News Article Highlights Garett Jones' Research Headlines

Boston Herald News Article Highlights Garett Jones' Research

In the Boston Herald article, "‘Hiring’ vs. jobs," Garett Jones' research on Obama's stimulus is discussed. Sept. 5, 2011

Alumnus Named Prime Minister of Somalia

Alumnus Named Prime Minister of Somalia

Abdiweli Mohamed Ali, PhD economics ’00, has been named prime minister of Somalia, placing him one spot below the war-torn country’s president, Sheik Sharif Ahmed. Ali is an associate professor of economics at Niagara University outside Buffalo.

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Roberts' Rap Video on C-SPAN In The Media

Roberts' Rap Video on C-SPAN

Russ Roberts, along with his rap-video co-producer, John Papola, was featured on C-SPAN at 8PM (EST) on June 19, 2011, with Brian Lamb.

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Roberts' Rap Video on C-SPAN In The Media

Roberts' Rap Video on C-SPAN

Russ Roberts, along with his rap-video co-producer, John Papola, was featured on C-SPAN at 8PM (EST) on June 19, 2011, with Brian Lamb.

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Dan Klein Lectures on Adam Smith in Stockholm, Sweden Faculty Afoot

Dan Klein Lectures on Adam Smith in Stockholm, Sweden

Dan Klein gave a lecture on Adam Smith in Stockholm, Sweden, at the Ratio Institute on May 31, 2011.

Dan Klein Lectures in Sweden on Adam Smith Faculty Afoot

Dan Klein Lectures in Sweden on Adam Smith

Professor Dan Klein and an associate researcher, will hold a lecture in Sweden on Adam Smith's thoughts and visions, entitled "Adam Smith: An Overview of his Work and Vision," on May 31 from 6 to 7:30pm. (Use Google Chrome to translate.)

Boudreaux with Judge Napolitano In The Media

Boudreaux with Judge Napolitano

Starting at the 21:41 mark, Don Boudreaux discusses his recent WSJ article on school choice with Judge Napolitano on his television show.

National Review article featuring Walter Williams In The Media

National Review article featuring Walter Williams

John Miller's article in the National Review features Professor Walter Williams.

Don Boudreaux on "If Supermarkets Were Like Public Schools" In The Media

Don Boudreaux on "If Supermarkets Were Like Public Schools"

In this creative Wall Street Journal article, "If Supermarkets Were Like Public Schools," Dr. Boudreaux illustrates how competitive markets respond to consumer choice and compares how government-run supermarkets would be similar to public school education.

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Caplan Applies Economics to Parenting

Caplan Applies Economics to Parenting

Bryan Caplan, professor of economics, applies economic theory to parenting in his new book, “Selfish Reasons to Have More Kids: Why Being a Great Parent Is Less Work and More Fun Than You Think.” The book concludes that parenting methods have very little effect on children when they become adults.

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Don Boudreaux Speaks for Cato Institute: Don't Fear the Trade Deficit Faculty Afoot

Don Boudreaux Speaks for Cato Institute: Don't Fear the Trade Deficit

Professor Boudreaux is also an Adjunct Scholar at the Cato Institute. On March 24, 2011, he spoke at the Cato Hill Briefing and argued that the U.S. trade deficit is less of a problem than many people might believe. He said that trade deficits are prime indicators of foreign investment in a country, which will inevitably lead to wage and standard of living increases.

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"It’s Time to Face the Fiscal Illusion" Headlines

"It’s Time to Face the Fiscal Illusion"

Tyler Cowen's recent New York Times article explains the perverse political incentives that motivate the making of fiscal policy. These incentives were famously and carefully identified by Mason's Professors, James Buchanan and Richard Wagner.

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Russ Roberts Testifies for Subcommittee on Regulatory Affairs: Stimulus Oversight & Govt Spending Faculty Afoot

Russ Roberts Testifies for Subcommittee on Regulatory Affairs: Stimulus Oversight & Govt Spending

In Dr. Russ Roberts’ testimony to the Subcommittee on Regulatory Affairs: Stimulus Oversight and Government Spending, he explains what went wrong with the stimulus packages. He purports that the Keynsian models that justify the stimulus package were flawed. He states that Keynsian models have been wrong before and sites examples of government actions during World War II. Dr. Roberts’ advice to the subcommittee: “Let’s get back to basics; when you’re in a hole, stop digging. Stop running deficits of over 1.5 trillion dollars and counting. Act like grownups; get your fiscal house in order. Stop spending 25% of what we produce. Stop wasting my money and giving it to your friends. Stop passing legislation that makes it hard to figure out what the rules of the game are going to be. Get out of the way; make government smaller and give us a chance to do what comes naturally, seeking ways to make profit, avoid loss, and work together.”

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Cowen's New Book Draws Attention, Sparks Debate

Cowen's New Book Draws Attention, Sparks Debate

George Mason University economist Tyler Cowen recently published his latest book, The Great Stagnation, as an e-book. His work has drawn much attention, including reviews and commentary by the Washington Post, New York Times and Forbes.com.

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Tyler Cowen Selected as the 2011 Economics Alumnus of the Year Accolades

Tyler Cowen Selected as the 2011 Economics Alumnus of the Year

Congratulations to Tyler Cowen who has been selected as the Economics Alumnus of the Year by the Department of Economics at George Mason University! This award is a College of Humanities and Social Sciences award recognizing and honoring outstanding alumni for their achievements. Dr. Cowen will be recognized in a celebration on May 20, 2011 at 12:30 PM (immediately following the undergraduate convocation ceremony) in the Edwin Meese Conference Room in Mason Hall.

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Freakonomics References Professor Klein's Survey Data In The Media

Freakonomics References Professor Klein's Survey Data

In the New York Times Freakonomics blog article, "Should We Be Surprised at Political Bias in Academia?" the author shows that many social psychologists have a liberal bias. Professor Daniel Klein's data is referenced as the addendum and the article links directly to his survey data and documents.

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Williams Celebrated in the Wall Street Journal In The Media

Williams Celebrated in the Wall Street Journal

The January 22, 2011, edition of the Wall Street Journal features a splendid celebration of Mason's, the great Walter Williams, in the article, "The State Against Blacks." Dr. William's just-published autobiography, Up From the Projects, is now available.

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Tabarrok on Bounty Hunting In The Media

Tabarrok on Bounty Hunting

Alex Tabarrok's captivating article, "The Bounty Hunter's Pursuit of Justice," for the Winter 2011 issue of The Wilson Quarterly explains how bounty hunting is one aspect of law enforcement is successfully provided privately in the U.S.

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Thomas Hazlett's article, "Fred Kahn’s first-class flight," is a tribute to the late Prof. Alfred Kahn In The Media

Thomas Hazlett's article, "Fred Kahn’s first-class flight," is a tribute to the late Prof. Alfred Kahn

Mason's Professor Thomas Hazlett writes of the many contributions of Professor Alfred Kahn, Pulitzer Prize winner, to deregulate airline fares, electricity, and telecommunications. He writes how Kahn's reforms "upended many regulatory inefficiencies" in the New State Public Service Commission and how "consumers, the environment, and the economy benefited." After being appointed to the Civil Aeronautics Board by President Jimmy Carter, he was able to reject the "bureaucratic goobledeegook" and speek freely, offering "opinions that citizens (and journalists) could understand." Alfred Kahn passed away in Ithaca, New York, on December 27, 2010.

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The WSJ lists Cowen, Tabarrok, and Caplain in "The Best Economics Blogs" In The Media

The WSJ lists Cowen, Tabarrok, and Caplain in "The Best Economics Blogs"

The Economics Department is proud to announce that the Wall Street Journal just released its list of best economics blogs, and three of Mason's Economics Professors are explicitly mentioned as being responsible for two outstanding blogs in the article, "The Best Economics Blogs." Tyler Cowen and Alex Tabarrok write Marginal Revolution (which was rightly singled out by the WSJ as the very best econ blog) and Bryan Caplan (who blogs at EconLog with David Henderson and Arnold Kling) was also mentioned for his great blogging of Library of Economics and Liberty. Congratulations to Tyler, Alex, and Bryan for their continuing and successful efforts to extend economic understanding through their blogs!

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Walter Williams on Free Trade In The Media

Walter Williams on Free Trade

Walter Williams' article, " 'Fair Trade'? Free Trade Is Fair Trade," in Investors Business Daily explains that free trade IS fair trade.

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Grad Student, Nathaneal Smith, has Book Published Publications

Grad Student, Nathaneal Smith, has Book Published

The Locke Institute has just launched a new 200 page book by Nathanael Smith entitled, Principles of a Free Society. In 2009 Nathanael Smith co-authored with Charles Rowley in Economic Contractions in the United States: A failure of Government and is currently writing his doctoral dissertation in economics under Dr. Rowley's supervision. Nathaneal is a brilliant and original economist who has made a great contribution in this book to our understanding of the nature of a free society. Dr. Rowley has more information about the book in his December 21, 2010 blog and assures you that you will find this book "stimulating and immensely informative."

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PhD student, Steven Davis, and SpaceX Launch In The Media

PhD student, Steven Davis, and SpaceX Launch

Mason's Economics PhD student, Steven Davis, is also a rocket scientist who works for a company called SpaceX. On December 8, 2010, SpaceX became the first commercial company in history to re-enter a spacecraft from low-Earth orbit. This marks the first successful test flight of a Dragon spacecraft, which is an entirely new spacecraft designed in the last decade, and it was successful after only the second test flight of the Falcon 9 launch vehicle. Congratulations to Steve and SpaceX!

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Professor White on C-SPAN In The Media

Professor White on C-SPAN

Professor Larry White appeared on C-SPAN (along with Judy Shelton, Rep. Paul Ryan, and others), in defense of sound money and in opposition to central banking. Larry's ten-minute-long remarks start around the 47min., 15 sec. mark. Specifically, he discusses his, George Selgin's, and William Lastrapes's recent paper "Has the Fed Been a Failure?"

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Roberts on Public Radio In The Media

Roberts on Public Radio

Russ Roberts was featured on the Public Radio International show, "To the Point," discussing various economic matters.

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The Wonderful World of Masonomics

The Wonderful World of Masonomics

In addition to teaching, Mason's economics faculty members have academic responsibilities that include publishing their scholarship, administrative duties such as running centers, and committee work. But for the Mason economists, the work day doesn’t stop there.

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Economics Student Serves Valuable Apprenticeship

Economics Student Serves Valuable Apprenticeship

Economics student Mattie Albert began an apprenticeship with Dr. David Levy that has helped her to become a better researcher. Levy has viewed the relationship as mutually beneficial, relying on Albert's knowledge of Arabic to help the two gain a better understanding of what attracts young Muslims to Islamic extremism.

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New Leaders Highlight College Faculty Transitions

New Leaders Highlight College Faculty Transitions

Over the summer, the College of Humanities and Social Sciences welcomed many new faculty and staff members, while some current college employees added other responsibilities to their slate. The Global Affairs and Biodefense programs have new directors and the Department of Public and International Affairs has a new chair.

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Stratmann Quoted in Wall Street Journal In The Media

Stratmann Quoted in Wall Street Journal

In the Wall Street Journal article, "Is Your Car Getting You More Traffic Tickets?" by Joseph B. White, Thomas Stratmann's research on traffic citations is highlighted. Stratmann quotes statistics and groups of people who are most and least likely to be ticketed.

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Al-Ubaydli Appointed to Governor's Advisory Board Headlines

Al-Ubaydli Appointed to Governor's Advisory Board

We are proud to announce that Professor Omar Al-Ubaydli has been appointed to Virginia Governor Bob McDonnell's Joint Advisory Board of Economics. Fletcher Magnum, a George Mason University Economics PhD alumnus, was also appointed to the Advisory Board of Economics as well.

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Jones Presents Abroad Faculty Afoot

Jones Presents Abroad

Professor Garett Jones presented his paper, "IQ in the Utility Function," at the Midwest Macroeconomics Meetings, Canadian Economics Association Meetings, and the University of the Philippines.

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The German Miracle: Another Look

The German Miracle: Another Look

Germany has cut government spending and its economy is growing smartly. It's not the first time that market-friendly policies have led the nation out of crisis.

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Boettke Featured in Wall Street Journal Profile

Boettke Featured in Wall Street Journal Profile

Kelly Evans of the Wall Street Journal recently penned a full-length profile on nationally recognized economics professor Peter Boettke. The article focuses on his work and his status as a champion of sorts for the Austrian school of economics. Image courtesy of Creative Services.

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Boudreaux Co-Author of New Alcohol Study In The Media

Boudreaux Co-Author of New Alcohol Study

A new study from the Virginia Institute for Public Policy, co-authored by economics professor Donald Boudreaux, finds that privatizing Virginia's ABC stores will have no effect on the number of alcohol-related health problems in the commonwealth.

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College Students Win Language Scholarships

College Students Win Language Scholarships

Three Mason students were awarded U.S. Department of State Critical Language Scholarships to study abroad this summer. The students are among 575 U.S. undergraduate and graduate students selected from nearly 5,300 applicants.

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The Rational Optimist: How Prosperity Evolves

The Rational Optimist: How Prosperity Evolves

Matt Ridley, bestselling author of The Red Queen, Nature via Nurture, and other books, tells the story of human cultural and economic evolution in his latest work, The Rational Optimist: How Prosperity Evolves. Combining the best of economics and biology, he explains both the "how" and "why" of the amazing (and recent) explosion in worldwide human well-being.

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"The Breeder's Cup" In The Media

"The Breeder's Cup"

In a Father's Day weekend Wall Street Journal essay, Economics' professor Bryan Caplan makes the case for having more children. "Social science may suggest that kids drain their parents' happiness, but there's evidence that good parenting is less work and more fun than people think."

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Will Quotes Roberts In The Media

Will Quotes Roberts

Washington Post columnist George Will turns to Economics professor Russ Roberts for a view on the Greek bailout.

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Tyler Cowen Revealed in Washington Post Profile

Tyler Cowen Revealed in Washington Post Profile

Economics' professor Tyler Cowen is profiled in the Washington Post Style section. In addition to more predictable economic topics, Cowen shares his views about autism, ethnic food in the suburbs, and getting kids to do the dishes.

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Student Award Recipients

Student Award Recipients

Each year, departments and programs present awards to their outstanding students. The college is proud to announce the recipients of these awards for 2009-2010. Congratulations to all the department's students for their outstanding achievements.

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Frans B.M. de Waal to Lecture at Mason

Frans B.M. de Waal to Lecture at Mason

On Monday April 12 at 2 p.m., Frans BM de Waal, a Dutch-born ethologist/biologist known for his work on the social intelligence of primates, delivers a lecture, "The Age of Empathy: Primate Behavior and Human Society."

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Economist Cowen to Lecture on Current Financial Crisis

Economist Cowen to Lecture on Current Financial Crisis

Tyler Cowen, the Holbert L. Harris Chair in Economics, is the featured speaker in the next Vision Series lecture on Monday, March 29, at 7 p.m. He is also the general director of the Mercatus Center, an economics research and outreach group at Mason.

College Students among Mason’s Truman Scholarship Finalists

College Students among Mason’s Truman Scholarship Finalists

Of the three Mason undergraduate finalists for the 2010 Harry S. Truman Scholarships, two hail from departments within the College of Humanities and Social Sciences. D’Leon Barnett is majoring in integrative studies with a concentration in education for social sciences, and Whitney Burton is majoring in economics.

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Stratmann Wins Duncan Black Prize

Stratmann Wins Duncan Black Prize

Thomas Stratmann, economics professor at George Mason University, was awarded the Duncan Black Prize for “best paper in Public Choice in 2009.” Stratmann's paper “How Prices Matter in Politics: The Returns to Campaign Advertising” examines the effect of campaign advertising by U.S. Representatives on their vote shares in congressional elections.

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Warren Brown and Robert Pinsky to Speak at Convocations

Warren Brown and Robert Pinsky to Speak at Convocations

The College of Humanities and Social Sciences is proud to announce the speakers for this year’s convocation ceremonies. Warren Brown, the founder and owner of successful bakery CakeLove and Love Café’, and poet and author Robert Pinsky are the speakers for this year’s convocation ceremonies.

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Roberts on Adam Smith on CSPAN In The Media

Roberts on Adam Smith on CSPAN

Economics professor Russ Roberts and University of Illinois professor Sam Fleischacker discuss Adam Smith's The Wealth of Nations on CSPAN BookTV.

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Economics Student Strobl's Journal Becomes Hollywood Movie

Economics Student Strobl's Journal Becomes Hollywood Movie

In April 2004, Lieutenant Colonel Michael Strobl, a U.S. Marine, escorted the remains of 19-year-old Lance Corporal Chance Phelps back to his family in Dubois, Wyoming. Strobl, who is now a PhD student in Mason's economics program, recently had his journal turned into a movie called “Taking Chance.”

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Tyler Cowen on the Median Voter Theorum In The Media

Tyler Cowen on the Median Voter Theorum

Writing in The New York Times, Cowen says, "For all the anecdotal evidence, it’s hard to show statistically that money has a large and systematic influence on political outcomes. That is partly because politicians cannot stray too far from public opinion."

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Roberts Raps on Keynes and Hayek

Roberts Raps on Keynes and Hayek

Economics Professor Russ Roberts wants to explain the important differences between Keynes's and Hayek's understanding of economic booms and busts. What better way than featuring these economic giants in a rap video? Watch this latest production from econstories.tv, "Fear the Boom and Bust,"at Cafe Hayek.

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College Students Win Global Education Awards

College Students Win Global Education Awards

While many of the College of Humanities and Social Sciences' students will travel abroad this winter, 20 of them are headed to places likes Israel, Palestine, London, Switzerland, Greece, and Turkey thanks to awards from Mason's Center for Global Education.

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The Job Market and the Great Recession

The Job Market and the Great Recession

Mason economist Russ Roberts' full testimony is posted on the web site of the Mercatus Center. He concludes, "It would be good to recognize our limits about what we imagine we can design. We cannot steer the economy. Or the labor market. Recognizing our limitations is a step in the right direction."

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Mason Economist on How Little We Know

Mason Economist on How Little We Know

Russ Roberts offers keen insight and wisdom in The Economists' Voice, a publication of the Berkeley Electronic Press. The summary: "If only preventing financial crashes were as straightforward as preventing airlines crashes. Russell Roberts explains the implications for future financial reform."

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VIDEO: Colleges Announce Winners of Award for Scholarship

VIDEO: Colleges Announce Winners of Award for Scholarship

Economics professor Tyler Cowen is the 2009 recipient of the Award for Scholarship. He will be recognized at the Celebration of Scholarship on October 2 along with Professor Jagadish Shukla, the recipient of the College of Science Award for Scholarship. This year's recipients are featured in a slide-show.

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Dr. Vernon Smith Awarded the Nobel Prize in Economics

Dr. Vernon Smith Awarded the Nobel Prize in Economics

Along with Dr. Daniel Kahneman, Dr. Smith was given this award "for having established laboratory experiments as a tool in empirical economic analysis, especially in the study of alternative market mechanisms." To hear Dr. Smith's Nobel Prize lecture and other resources please visit the Nobel e-Museum's website.